Interstellar (2014)

Christopher Nolan’s past masterpiece include Batman’s “Dark Knight Trilogy” and “Inception”, and these days whenever the director releases a movie it automatically attracts levels of high expectation. So it should come as no shock that people expected great things from Nolan’s space epic film entitled “Interstellar.” Were those expectations met? Well, it definitely looks REALLY pretty, and will have obvious appeal to those people interested in Einstein’s theory of general relativity, wormholes, and all sorts of other theoretical physics related stuff. Others, however, have called it a “magnificent folly” or an “awe-inspiring mess”.

“Interstellar” is about the Earth’s impending destruction and an attempt by humankind’s remaining scientists to launch a rocket to another galaxy in the hopes of finding a new planet for Earth’s population to colonize and start a new life. One of the mission’s crew, NASA’s top space pilot Cooper (Matthew McConaughey) is afraid of the toll this mission will take on his family’s lifespan and the fact his 10-year-old daughter Murphy (Mackenzie Foy) may die from old age before her father ever returns. Nevertheless, Cooper, Dr. Brandt (Anne Hathaway) and a handful of explorers venture off into an unknown galaxy in Earth’s last ditch effort to save the human race before the planet we once called home becomes extinct.

Interstellar (2014) “Interstellar” start off slow despite some amusing parental antics from McConaughey, then slowly get more interesting as they reach space, when things get emotional and heart breaking before eventually getting really weird. Throughout the movie, McConaughey, Hathaway and Michael Caine present some truly moving emotional scenes, and the journey into space wields a lot of great ideas and compelling conflicts. Overall, “Interstellar” has the cast, the music and the visuals to truly live up to Nolan’s well-earned reputation for excellence. One issue, however, is that the space voyage goes to too many places, and takes too long to get there; while the finale results in more unanswered questions than many may care to spend the time contemplating.

Director: Christopher Nolan
Writers: Jonathan Nolan, Christopher Nolan
Music: Hans Zimmer
Budget: $165 million
Box Office: $675.1 million
IMDB Rating: 8.6
Rotten Tomatoes: 71%

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